Monday, February 1, 2016



Inventors Association of Saint Louis,

Venture Cafe, @4240 Duncan Ave, 2nd Floor
St. Louis, MO 63110

Come and join us....meet fellow inventors! Network.....

6:00 to 7:00 – How to Protect Your Trade Secrets from Theft | Inventors Association of St. Louis February Meet Up
How to Protect Your Trade Secrets from Theft – FBI representatives will discuss the significance of trade secrets and how the theft thereof negatively impacts businesses. The representatives will discuss the problem’s impact, indicators to watch out for, and ways to mitigate the problem.

Thursday, January 21, 2016

Agents Seize Phone Hoverboards at Minnesota-Canada Border

January 20, 2016
INTERNATIONAL FALLS, Minn. (AP) - U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents earlier this month seized nearly $650,000 in counterfeit merchandise coming into Minnesota from Canada, including hundreds of hoverboards.

Field operations officers at the International Falls port of entry found the contraband in a rail container destined for nearby Rainier, agency officials said Wednesday.  They seized 1,650 Smart Balance hoverboards and 90 computer motherboards with Bluetooth counterfeit trademark violations. This merchandise has a manufacturer's suggested retail price of $645,252, authorities said.

Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Inventing Merit Badge

If you are interested in earning the Boy Scout Inventing Merit Badge, you can consider attending a special program called, KIDSINVENT. It will be held on Saturday, April 2, 2016, from 10:30 am to 12:30 pm in the Central Library auditorium of the Saint Louis Public Library located at 101 Olive Street, St. Louis, MO 63103-2325.

Inventors will be presenting how they thought of an idea and then made it to a product. The program will include making something that will be an invention. Patent and trademark resources available at the Saint Louis Public Library Patent and Trademark Resource Center will be shown. This program is free and families are encouraged to attend.

For registration, please go to http://www.inventstl.info. For further information you can call Spruce at (314) 539-0390 or email at sfraser@slpl.org.

Saturday, January 16, 2016

Denver's Patent Office Has A New Director

Denver Business Journal
January 14, 2016

The U.S. Patent & Trademark Office on Thursday named Colorado patent lawyer Molly Kocialski as a director of the Rocky Mountain Regional United States Patent and Trademark Office in Denver.

Kocialski's extensive experience and familiarity with the region's unique ecosystem of industries and stakeholders will be an asset to the USPTO," said Michelle Lee, USPTO Director and Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectural Property, in a blog post announcing the appointment.

As the new director, Kocialski will be responsible for bringing "the USPTO’s resources directly to the local innovation community, helping to fuel economic growth a nd innovation in the region, as well as oversee the local team of patent examiners and PTAB judges."

Thursday, December 17, 2015

News Blast - USPTO Coming to Saint Louis Public Library

I am in the planning stages of having another United States Patent and Trademark Office Day next year.
Stay tuned for the agenda in the New Year! If you are interested in what is new in the Patent and Trademark world, keep Tuesday, April 26th, 2016 free for a one-day USPTO Seminar.

Continuing legal education credits will be offered for attorneys attending this exciting seminar. For those interested in a more hands-on patent and trademark workshop, please keep Wednesday, April 27th,  2016 free too. I will be posting an agenda on this web site in the coming weeks. Stay tuned!

For more information about these two events, please email our Saint Louis Public Library Patent and Trademark Resource Center  Library, Spruce, at sfraser@slpl.org or phone (314) 539-0390.

Monday, December 7, 2015

Protecting property rights in works of authorship spurs creative innovations

By Sandra Aistars & Mark Schultz
December 4, 2015

Earlier this week the Center for the Protection of Intellectual Property (CPIP) at George Mason University School of Law released a new white paper, Copyright Principles and Priorities to Foster a Creative Digital Marketplace, by Sandra Aistars, Devlin, Hartline, and Mark Schultz. The authors suggest principles and priorities for Congress to consider as it embarks on the next phase of its review of the Copyright Act.

The authors also give a brief overview of the constitutional origins of copyright protection, explaining how the premise of our copyright system - that authors' rights philosophy in the early American Republic.  They then examine several ways in which the copyright system fulfills its purpose, as envisioned by the Founders, by driving innovation in the creative industries.

Thursday, December 3, 2015

Missed Connections: Seeking The Girl on the Train, Found Girl on a Train

National Law Review
December 2, 2015

The Wall Street Journal recently reported the spike in e-book sales of Alison Waine's two-year-old novel, Girl On A Train.  The cause? Apparently, some customers thought they were purchasing The New York Times' best seller (and soon-to-be film starring Emily Blunt and Justin Theroux) The Girl on The Train, by Paula Hawkins.

How could this happen? Surely, trademark or copyright law must protect authors and unsuspecting readers from confusing books with similar titles. Can't you copyright or trademark a book title?


The following steps can be taken to work around this requirement, and help establish trademark rights in the title of a creative work in the U.S.

First, think broadly—beyond the title of the creative work (book, film, etc.) itself. Plan ahead in terms of whether any merchandise may be offered that is related to the work, or whether the work will be part of a series.

Second, select and clear a title that is available as both a title and a trademark to identify the type of creative work (book, film, etc.), and as a trademark to identify any ancillary merchandise or services. The more creative and unique the title, the better. Titles that are descriptive/informative as to the content can be considered “merely descriptive” and even harder to protect for any related merchandise sold in connection with the creative work.

Third, apply to register the title as a trademark in connection with the series of creative works and any related merchandise with the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office (“USPTO”).

Fourth, use the title with the series of creative works and any related merchandise listed in the trademark application. The manner of use is important because the USPTO will not grant a registration without proper proof that the title is being used in U.S. commerce. For a series of creative works, proper proof of use may be a digital image of at least two works using the same title. However, keep in mind that the content of the two works must be different, Simply showing the same titled work in different media (e.g., a hard cover and an e-book), or a second work that is a mere translation of the first work, would not constitute proper proof of use.

By taking these steps, authors are better positioned to assert trademark rights in the title of a creative work to stop copycats seeking to profit off similarly titled works. Or, at the very least, help consumers identify the book they hoped to read—as in the case of Ms. Waines and Ms. Hawkins.
© 2015 Sterne Kessler
- See more at: http://www.natlawreview.com/article/missed-connections-seeking-girl-train-found-girl-train-authorship-protection#sthash.IT9mV67R.dpuf

Missed Connections: Seeking The Girl on the Train, Found Girl on a Train - Authorship Protection

The Wall Street Journal recently reported the spike in e-book sales of Alison Waines' two-year-old novel, Girl on a Train. The cause? Apparently, some customers thought they were purchasing The New York Times' best seller (and soon-to-be film starring Emily Blunt and Justin Theroux), The Girl on the Train, by Paula Hawkins.
 
- See more at: http://www.natlawreview.com/article/missed-connections-seeking-girl-train-found-girl-train-authorship-protection#sthash.IT9mV67R.dpuf

Missed Connections: Seeking The Girl on the Train, Found Girl on a Train - Authorship Protection

The Wall Street Journal recently reported the spike in e-book sales of Alison Waines' two-year-old novel, Girl on a Train. The cause? Apparently, some customers thought they were purchasing The New York Times' best seller (and soon-to-be film starring Emily Blunt and Justin Theroux), The Girl on the Train, by Paula Hawkins.
 
- See more at: http://www.natlawreview.com/article/missed-connections-seeking-girl-train-found-girl-train-authorship-protection#sthash.IT9mV67R.dpuf